Microsoft’s Browser Selection + User Ignorance Lets Google’s Chrome “cheat”?

Image representing Google as depicted in Crunc...
Image via CrunchBase

Michael B. from the Mozilla Marketing list recently posted an hypothesis on why Google Chrome may suddenly start taking a much larger chunk out of the browser market now that Microsoft’s browser selection screens are appearing in the EU.

I’ve a hypothesis to explain Chrome’s recent and sudden surge of usage share the last couple months. Let me first say that almost every time I ever ask what web browser someone uses, the answer I get is Google. After I explain that Google is a search engine, not a web browser they usually tell me that they have no idea. I later find out that they are either using Internet Explorer or Firefox. Enter Microsoft’s new browser ballot into the equation. Instead of just saying “Chrome,” Google’s web browser says “Google” and then says “chrome” in smaller letter. People are asked what web browser they want so they think, I want to search with Google of course so they choose Chrome. If this is the case, it might be a problem that should be addressed.

Perhaps user ignorance on what a browser actually is will give Google a major boost.  Because, admittedly, even my own father reference to Internet Explorer as “my internet”.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

6 thoughts on “Microsoft’s Browser Selection + User Ignorance Lets Google’s Chrome “cheat”?

  1. I already loved using it on Windows, and I noticed most of my geek friends switching to Chrome since its GNU/Linux version became stable. It’s simply a lot faster and more usable than Firefox, which I now mainly use because of Firebug.

  2. Robert – You may not test chrome. But if they start controlling a share of the market, I would be surprised if you did not readdress that standpoint. Even a bad coder overcomes preference to understand the necessity of compatibility. One of these days, maybe HTML 5 or its predecessor will get it right and force browser compliance standards across the board. Then it will be down to feature sets included with the browser application.

    In regards to the hype – I think that is a really good point, but if we get to the point where we control the size of what a user/business is allowed to set for their product font – open source will be in trouble. Where is the line of ignorance vs fairness drawn? I agree that there still exists a substantial uniformed user base, however, I also argue that the newer generations of users growing up on the internet provides the level of aptitude required for deciding what you want in your own browser, vice the mindset of “I just want to search Google”.

    In the end, Google popped up over night. History says to me, whomever provides the next best thing is what is going to be the standard regardless of monopoly.

  3. I think this might give Google Chrome a push. And why not? Google Chrome is not the worst browser in the market and if you are using Firefox or Chrome does not matter in the meaning of “I don’t want my search data transferred to Google”. They both do so. Any way to lower IE market share is still necessary. 🙂

  4. Robert – You may not test chrome. But if they start controlling a share of the market, I would be surprised if you did not readdress that standpoint. Even a bad coder overcomes preference to understand the necessity of compatibility. One of these days, maybe HTML 5 or its predecessor will get it right and force browser compliance standards across the board. Then it will be down to feature sets included with the browser application.

    In regards to the hype – I think that is a really good point, but if we get to the point where we control the size of what a user/business is allowed to set for their product font – open source will be in trouble. Where is the line of ignorance vs fairness drawn? I agree that there still exists a substantial uniformed user base, however, I also argue that the newer generations of users growing up on the internet provides the level of aptitude required for deciding what you want in your own browser, vice the mindset of “I just want to search Google”.

    In the end, Google popped up over night. History says to me, whomever provides the next best thing is what is going to be the standard regardless of monopoly.

Leave a Reply